The Definitive Guide To Five Nights At Freddy’s Books In Order

Based on the popular video game series of the same name, Five Nights at Freddy’s is a popular survival horror franchise that has spanned all forms of media over the last few years – even including a popular novel and anthology series.

The Definitive Guide to Five Nights At Freddy’s Books In Order

Created by video games developer Scott Cawthon, Five Nights at Freddy’s was initially conceived as a tongue-in-cheek response to the criticism of his first game project – a family-friendly outing called Chipper & Sons Lumber Co, the mascot of which was a beaver that critics referred to as scary and unsettling.

Taking this idea and running with it, Cawthon created the concept for the FNAF series – leaning into the disturbing survival horror genre to create something truly unique and unsettling.

What Is The Series About?

Within the video game series, Five Nights at Freddy’s sees the player take on the role of a nighttime employee at ‘Freddy Fazbear’s Pizza’ –  a family pizza restaurant named after its animatronic teddy bear mascot of the same name.

Throughout the game, the player must then use stealth, security cameras, vents, ducts, and any tools at their disposal to survive the hordes of unsettling animatronic children’s toys that inhabit the pizzeria – all of whom have murderous tendencies and equally unsettling personalities.

When it comes to the spin-off novelization of the series, the books do not technically fit together entirely with the video games – however, they do inhabit the same narrative space, and help to expand some of the lore surrounding the mysterious pizzeria and the seemingly living animatronics that live there.

The first novel in the series, Five Nights at Freddy’s: The Silver Eyes, eventually reveals that the animatronics are the souls of murdered children and that the real killer is the former co-owner of Freddy Fazbear’s pizza – a man who wears a golden version of the ‘Freddy’ suit to blend in with the vengeful animatronics.

FNAF: The Definitive Reading Order

As with any series of novels – particularly those that take a more stand alone approach – it can be tricky for new readers to know the right order in which to approach them. 

Luckily, we have compiled this handy guide, allowing you to know the definitive reading order for the Five Nights at Freddy’s series. So, without further ado, let’s get started!

Five Nights At Freddy’s: The Silver Eyes (2015)

The Silver Eyes: Five Nights at Freddy’s (Original Trilogy Book 1) (1)

Following her father’s blame for a grisly murder and his subsequent suicide 10 years prior, Charlie returns to her hometown to reconnect with her old friends and to look for the truth surrounding the murders that destroyed her family.

Pros

  • Good world-building
  • Good lore building
  • Relatable, likable characters
  • Tense and suspenseful
  • Chilling at times

Cons

Themes: regret, legacy, truth, family, friendship

Five Nights At Freddy’s: The Twisted Ones (2017)

The Twisted Ones: Five Nights at Freddy’s (Original Trilogy Book 2) (2)

Set one year after the events of the first novel, The Twisted Ones sees Charlie looking for a fresh start away from her traumatic past.

However, following a move to a new school and town, the bodies start piling up once more – each of them bearing strikingly similar injuries to the ones from Freddy’s.

Pros

  • Solid sequel to the original
  • Likable protagonist 
  • Tense and suspenseful
  • Action-packed
  • Chilling at times

Cons

  • Some minor plot holes throughout

Themes: redemption, fresh starts, legacy, the past, family

Five Nights At Freddy’s: The Fourth Closet (2018)

The Fourth Closet: Five Nights at Freddy’s (Original Trilogy Book 3)

Returning once more to Hurricane, Utah, The Fourth Closet sees Charlie’s friends shaken by her apparent disappearance – not to mention the shadowy circumstances surrounding the event.

Pros

  • Interesting concepts
  • Likable characters
  • Intriguing mystery
  • Tense and suspenseful
  • Scary at times

Cons

  • Weaker than others in series
  • Needed more room to grow and develop

Themes: friendship, murder, disappearances, mystery

Fazbear Frights #1: Into The Pit (2019)

Into the Pit (Five Nights at Freddy’s: Fazbear Frights #1)

This first short collection explores the consequences of desire.

Delving back into the mysterious, unsettling world of Five Nights at Freddy’s, we see a young boy named Oswald who wishes his summer was more interesting, a young girl named Sarah who wishes to be beautiful, and a teenager named Millie who wishes she could vanish from the face of the Earth.

Pros

  • Scary and interesting
  • Relatable characters
  • Tense and action-packed

Cons

  • Some loose ends

Themes: desire, change, consequences, supernatural, mystery

Fazbear Frights #2: Fetch (2020)

Fetch (Five Nights at Freddy’s: Fazbear Frights #2)

Tired of being pushed around, Greg decides to put his controversial science into practice, Alec plots tirelessly to expose his goody-two-shoes sister for the brat that she is, and Oscar decides to rebel against his controlling mother.

Pros

  • Interesting stories
  • Likable characters
  • Spooky tales
  • Well written
  • Tense at times

Cons

  • Could’ve been more suspenseful

Themes: control, rebellion, freedom, consequences

Fazbear Frights #3: 1:35am (2020)

1:35AM (Five Nights at Freddy’s: Fazbear Frights #3)

The third collection in the series follows three individuals all too familiar with loneliness.

Orphan and divorcee Delilah finds comfort in her deep, vivid dreams, newly single Stanley throws himself into his dead end, mysterious job, and Devon desperately seeks love and attention from a world that doesn’t seem willing to share.

Pros

  • Interesting character studies
  • Relatable characters
  • Tense at times
  • Scary at times
  • Well written

Cons

  • Weaker than previous installments

Themes: loneliness, connection, desperation, vulnerability

Fazbear Frights #4: Step Closer (2020)

Five Nights at Freddy’s: Fazbear Frights #4

Focusing on isolation, and the damage that it can do, Step Closer sees Pete lash out at his younger brother in the wake of his parent’s divorce, Kasey realizes the depths of her own misbehavior while on the streets, and Samantha and Susie as they struggle to connect with one another following a horrible tragedy.

Pros

  • Good character studies
  • Tragic and scary at times
  • Well written
  • Tense at times

Cons

  • Weaker structure

Themes: isolation, confrontation, distance, loneliness

Fazbear Frights #5: Bunny Call (2020)

Bunny Call: An AFK Book (Five Nights at Freddy’s: Fazbear Frights #5) (5)

Focusing on festering rage and resentment, Bunny Call sees a loathsome vacation for Bob and his family, a man named Matt who transfers his own rage into a video game, and a mysterious man with gruesome burns who spitefully stays alive despite the odds.

Pros

  • Interesting character studies
  • Well written
  • Tense
  • Action-packed

Cons

  • Quite dark content

Themes: darkness, rage, resentment, strife, spite

Fazbear Frights #6: Blackbird (2020)

Blackbird: An AFK Book (Five Nights at Freddy’s: Fazbear Frights #6) (6)

In Blackbird, we explore ideas of the past, and how sometimes it is best to confront the things we are afraid of.

In this collection we see Nole, who falls victim to a monster who punishes past transgressions, a young boy called Jake who dreams of his life before his illness, and Toby – whose desperation to prove himself to his brother sees him engaging with a mysterious and dangerous video game.

Pros

  • Interesting character studies
  • Well written
  • Tense and scary
  • Action-packed

Cons

  • Repetitive

Themes: the past, regret, self-worth, consequence, supernatural

Fazbear Frights #7: The Cliffs (2021)

The Cliffs: An AFK Book (Five Nights at Freddy’s: Fazbear Frights #7) (7)

In The Cliffs, readers can expect to be taken to a world where actions have consequences. Desperate to teach the school bully a lesson, Reed takes things too far with dire consequences

Robert, an exhausted father, experiences the hardships of single parenting when he buys a new teddy bear to watch his young son. Desperate to make it into the school science club, Chris undertakes a grisly experiment on himself to make the grade.

Pros

  • Good character studies
  • Interesting concepts
  • Tense at times
  • Action-packed

Cons

  • Somewhat repetitive

Themes: actions and consequences, lessons learned, supernatural

Fazbear Frights #8: Gumdrop Angel (2021)

Gumdrop Angel: An AFK Book (Five Nights at Freddy’s: Fazbear Frights #8) (8)

In Gumdrop Angel, we see just how unlucky life can be. Angel tries to foil her spoiled sister’s birthday party, a young man named Hudson who tries to turn his life around with a new job, and Sergio – whose obsession with a new toy could have devastating consequences. 

Pros

  • Interesting character studies
  • Interesting concepts
  • Tense
  • Action-packed

Cons

  • Weaker than past issues

Themes: luck, bad ideas, failed plans, hardship, supernatural

Fazbear Frights #9: The Puppet Carver (2021)

The Puppet Carver: An AFK Book (Five Nights at Freddy’s: Fazbear Frights #9) (9)

Exploring notions of failure, The Puppet Carver sees Jack taking drastic lengths to save his failing pizza business, Colton reimagining a frustrating video game at great personal expense, and Marley, whose own guilt surrounding her missing friend continues to consume her life.

Pros

  • Good character studies
  • Well written
  • Tense
  • Action-packed
  • Return to form

Cons

  • Lacks the magic of the original

Themes: failure, desperation, lack of judgment, recklessness, supernatural

Fazbear Frights #10: Friendly Face (2021)

Friendly Face: An AFK Book (Five Nights at Freddy’s: Fazbear Frights #10) (10)

Exploring ideas of acting without thinking – and the consequences that can follow – Friendly Face sees Edward desperately trying to preserve the memory of his friend at any cost, Mott being haunted by his brother’s persistent pets, and homecoming queen Jessica, whose clumsy work reprogramming an animatronic has dire consequences.

Pros

  • Interesting characters
  • Good moral lessons
  • Tense
  • Action-packed

Cons

  • Weaker than past renditions

Themes: recklessness, consequences, concentration, supernatural

Fazbear Frights #11: Prankster (2021)

Prankster: An AFK Book (Five Nights at Freddy’s: Fazbear Frights #11) (11)

Exploring what it means to stand up for yourself, Prankster sees Jeremiah standing up to an abusive boss, Joel dreaming of breaking away from his family business, and Aimee, who desperately tries to break away from her loud-mouthed friend while at Freddy Fazbear’s Pizza.

Pros

  • Good characterization
  • Interesting concepts
  • Tense
  • Action-packed

Cons

  • Repetitive

Themes: self-esteem, self-worth, consequences, individuality, supernatural

Fazbear Frights #12: Felix The Shark (2022)

Felix the Shark: An AFK Book (Five Nights at Freddy's Fazbear Frights #12)

Exploring the power of the past, Felix the Shark sees Dirk set out on a risky quest to retrieve a treasured belonging from an abandoned pizzeria, Mandy as she discovers haunting content in the files of her favorite computer game, and Sylvia, who buys her Freddy Fazbear-obsessed son a mask that takes authenticity to a whole new level.

Pros

  • Good moral lessons
  • Strong characterization
  • Good return to form
  • Tense

Cons

  • Considered non-canon

Themes: the past, risks, haunting, supernatural, consequences

Tales From The Pizzaplex #1: Lally’s Game (2022)

Lally's Game: An AFK Book (Five Nights at Freddy's: Tales from the Pizzaplex #1)

In Lally’s Game, we see the consequences of secrets. Selena chases an artifact from her fiance’s past, Jessica lives a double life that her friends and colleagues don’t know about, and Maya can’t help but explore an abandoned Freddy Fazbear megaplex.

Pros

  • Interesting concepts
  • Good characterization
  • Tense
  • Action-packed

Cons

  • Confusing for some

Themes: secrets, consequences, curiosity, supernatural

Tales From The Pizzaplex #2: HAPPS (2022)

HAPPS: An AFK Book (Five Nights at Freddy's: Tales from the Pizzaplex #2)

In HAPPS, we explore the consequences of desire.

Steve’s lofty ambitions see him take an opportunity that seems too good to be true, Aiden and Jace can’t help but scare some younger kids at the pizzaplex, and Billy just wants to be what he believes he is: an animatronic.

Pros

  • Good characterization
  • Good moral lessons
  • Tense
  • Action-packed

Cons

  • Quite gruesome

Themes: consequences, desire, temptation, supernatural

Tales From The Pizzaplex #3: Somniphobia (2022)

Somniphobia (Five Nights at Freddy's: Tales from the Pizzaplex 3) (Five Nights at Freddy's)

In Somniphobia, we explore the consequences of running away. Sam lives in constant fear of anything unhealthy, Luca is terrified by the Springtrap costume at Freddy’s Pizzaplex, and Grady fears being trapped in small spaces.

Pros

  • Good moral lessons
  • Good characterization
  • Tense
  • Action-packed

Cons

  • Slow burner

Themes: fear, consequences, supernatural

Tales From The Pizzaplex #4: Submechanophobia (2022)

Submechanophobia: An AFK Book (Five Nights at Freddy's: Tales from the Pizzaplex #4)

In Submechanophobia, we explore the notion of trusting your gut.

Caden believes that the underwater animatronics are not what they seem, Robbie suspects that the members of the Fazbear fan club have been mind-controlled, and Abe becomes paranoid that the animatronics experts in his apartment building are hiding something.

Pros

  • Good moral lessons
  • Tense stories
  • Interesting characters
  • Scary

Cons

  • Quite weak

Themes: trust, suspicion, supernatural, conspiracies

Final Thoughts

And there we have it, everything you need to know about the ‘Five Nights at Freddy’s’ series, and the best way to read the books in order!

Frequently Asked Questions

Is Five Nights At Freddy’s Suitable For Children?

Despite having the appearance of children’s media (stylistically), the Five Nights at Freddy’s series is certainly not for children or young readers – due to the distinct horror/survival nature of the series.

What Is The Intended Audience For The Books?

The original video games were rated ‘T’ for ‘teen’, due to the bloody violence and frightening elements that were present. As such, it would be safe to assume that the books have the same intended audience.

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Noah Burton